Tag Archives: Kids Design Glass

Kids Design Glass: Lighting the Creative Fire Within

By Alex Carr, Communications Manager

Kids Design Glass™ (KDG) has been a core educational program at Museum of Glass MOG) since its inception in 2004, inviting children both within and without the Museum to submit their designs. Although the process of selecting and transforming drawings into glass sculptures happens inside the Museum’s Hot Shop, MOG has partnered with outside organizations to bring Kids Design Glass to new audiences.

In March, Museum of Glass worked with Camp Fire, a national youth development organization, to incorporate glass art education into the program’s educational curriculum, as well as extend a Kids Design Glass opportunity to Camp Fire’s young participants. As part of a yearlong partnership between the two organizations, Camp Fire youth 12 and under from across the nation were invited to submit their drawings to Museum of Glass, encouraging kids and families to explore the medium of glass and their own personal creativity.

With the incredible amount of creative designs submitted, choosing just one drawing is always a difficult task for the Museum’s Hot Shop Team. After reviewing all submissions, Camp Fire’s nine-year-old Luca Thede’s design, I See You, was selected.

Luca ready to see the Museum's Hot Shop Team transform his design into glass.

Luca ready to see the Museum’s Hot Shop Team transform his design into glass.

Luca reviews the work in progress as artist John Miller shows him his sculpture.

Luca reviews the work in progress as artist John Miller shows him his sculpture.

Described as a boy of little words, Luca’s mother revealed how Camp Fire has encouraged her son to meet new friends. Similarly, being the selected Kids Design Glass artist challenged Luca to take center stage, nurturing his self-confidence, and talk to the Hot Shop’s artists about his vision for the sculpture.

Luca receiving his glass sculpture from Museum of Glass Registrar, Rebecca Engelhardt; Photo by Bob Noble.

Luca receiving his glass sculpture from Museum of Glass Registrar, Rebecca Engelhardt; Photo by Bob Noble.

According to Cathy Tisdale, President and CEO of Camp Fire, this Kids Design Glass opportunity was an ideal fit for Camp Fire’s Thrive(ology) methodology and the program’s National Art Experience, which empowers youth to explore art as a hobby or career. “The intention is to positively impact youth, their purpose, life, and social skills,” shares Tisdale. “We strive to increase personal creativity, increase competency in, and learn the appropriate application of, the art medium.”

Museum of Glass will continue to partner with other organizations, including Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium, in conjunction with the Museum’s upcoming exhibition, Into The Deep. Opening September 24, 2016, the new exhibition celebrates glass artists who are inspired by the ocean. It explores the way artists use glass to capture the motion and light of being underwater, as well as the colors and textures of marine life. In an effort to connect the Museum to its local marine organizations, exhibition curator Katie Buckingham believed Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium would be the perfect place to collect drawings for an Into The Deep– themed Kids Design Glass sculpture.

“It’s a natural connection,” notes Buckingham. “Children who are fascinated by the ocean and sea creatures they will now have the opportunity to apply that curiosity to a creative experience through Museum of Glass. I can’t wait to see the drawings designed by the aquarium’s youngest visitors.”

Museum of Glass and Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium will collaborate on Kids Design Glass in spring 2017. The selected marine-inspired drawing will be transformed into glass on Sunday, April 30, 2017.

For all Kids Design Glass dates, visit the Museum’s calendar.

Alex Carr is the Communications Manager at Museum of Glass. When she’s not circulating the Hot Shop floor trying to get the perfect Instagram shot for the Museum, you’ll find her baking at home, running at Green Lake, or exploring Washington’s wineries.

Farewell to Summer

By Alex Carr, Digital Media Coordinator

It’s hard to believe summer has already come and gone. Although fall/winter hours are now back at Museum of Glass (MOG), we’re still reminiscing about MOG’s busy summer season. So, let’s take a look back at some highlights!

Kids Design Glass Collaboration

This summer, Museum of Glass collaborated with the Shanghai Museum of Glass to create 20 new Kids Design Glass™ creatures. MOG’s Hot Shop Team received 100 designs from children in China, and after narrowing down their selection, they spent three weeks transforming the incredibly detailed drawings into glass sculptures.

The new Kids Design Glass creatures will be displayed at the Kids Museum of Glass, an offshoot of the Shanghai Museum of Glass.

Party on the Piazza

MOG’s summer visitors were treated to the wild and wondrous new exhibition Chihuly’s Venetians: The George R. Stroemple Collection, and what better way to celebrate Dale Chihuly’s Venetian works of art than with an Italian festival!

On August 1, the Museum of Glass outdoor plaza was transformed into an Italian piazza filled with free activities for the local community to enjoy. Guests made their own pizzas, sampled olive oil, tasted wine, indulged in gelato—and that’s just the food-related events!

The day also included performances by YMCA ballet dancers, Tango in Tacoma, stilt walkers and contortionists from Seattle’s School of Acrobatics and New Circus Acts (SANCA), and Portland-based band Rags & Ribbons.

Chihuly’s Venetians: The George R. Stroemple Collection is open through January 4, 2016.

Photos by Ali Daniels.

Rev Up for Red Hot

Museum of Glass wrapped up the summer season with an intimate party celebrating MOG’s upcoming Red Hot Auction & Gala on September 26, 2015. Seattle’s Glass Distillery hosted Rev Up for Red Hot, which featured a silent auction, speciality cocktails, and of course mingling amongst glass art lovers.

Special thanks to Seattle Met magazine for covering this event in the Met Pages!

Photos by Phototainment.

Although we’re saying farewell to summer, there is still plenty to do and see at Museum of Glass in the fall and winter. Check out MOG’s upcoming events and start marking your calendar.

Alex Carr is the Digital Media Coordinator at Museum of Glass. When she’s not circulating the Hot Shop floor trying to get the perfect Instagram shot for the Museum, you’ll find her baking at home, running at Green Lake, or exploring Washington’s wineries.

I Come in Peace Prepares for Lift-Off

By Katie Phelps, Curatorial Assistant/Visiting Artist Coordinator 

Last week I caught up with one of our teams from Federal Way High School, who designed a diorama for the Kids Design Glass piece Tis Ausome Landshark Ausomeness. This week, I chatted with Tran Chau, Edward Garcia, Peter Gitau, Paolo Honrade, Robert Hughes, Aaron Mathews and Jeremiah Mored who created a futuristic spaceship for I Come in Peace.

Tran Chau, Edward Garcia, Peter Gitau, Paolo Honrade, Robert Hughes, Aaron Mathews and Jeremiah Mored pose with their diorama.

Tran Chau, Edward Garcia, Peter Gitau, Paolo Honrade, Robert Hughes, Aaron Mathews and Jeremiah Mored pose with their diorama.

Describe the materials used to make your diorama.

We used pink insulation foam to sculpt the chair and the front console of the diorama. The floor was constructed out of XBox motherboards, and we used the pieces – USB ports, power cells, and so forth – to decorate the console. We stripped old wires to place on the outside of the front console. Silver corrugated cardboard was used to layer the outside of the console. Finally, we used a black foam core to cover most of the insulation foam.

Paolo and Jerry take hot gluing to a new level – they carefully trimmed off all of the strings so that the glue wouldn’t be visible on the control panel.

Paolo and Jerry take hot gluing to a new level – they carefully trimmed off all of the strings so that the glue wouldn’t be visible on the control panel.

What was the most challenging part of making your diorama?

Shaping the console and chair took most of our time. We had to make sure the foam was secured and sculpted correctly. Our group had to be certain that everything would fit and look neat together. Every component was covered with a coating of spray paint and foam core, which needed to be kept clean.

Where do you think the alien is traveling in his spaceship?

When we first saw the glass piece, our group imagined that the alien would be in his spaceship, flying around to different planets and meeting its inhabitants. The name I Come in Peace made us believe that the alien was talking to people and trying to make friends.

Which part of the diorama are you most proud of?

We are most proud of the lights on the diorama. It took a lot of work to position them correctly and place the wiring so it is unobtrusive to the rest of the diorama.

The electrical wiring for the lights is carefully concealed underneath the console.

The electrical wiring for the lights is carefully concealed underneath the console.

Who worked on the diorama? Which parts were they responsible for?

Aaron and Robert drilled down the console, platform and the chair. They also ripped apart the motherboards, and several people had to use band aids due to many injuries. Edward created the artwork on the N64 game, and created the design for the diorama using a 3D program (Sketch-Up), which worked out all the dimensions. Tran worked on spray painting the foam, diorama floor, and console buttons. Paolo and Jerry worked on gluing down and securing most of the decorations on the console and chair.

Peace.3

Katie Phelps is the Curatorial Assistant/Visiting Artist Coordinator at Museum of Glass. She is an alumnus of Whitman College (BA) and University of Washington (MA). In her life outside of the Museum she is outside as much as possible, wearing skis as often as she does hiking boots.   

Tizz Ausome Diorama Ausomeness

By Katie Phelps, Curatorial Assistant/Visiting Artist Coordinator

In our new display, Glass-o-rama: Habitats for Kids Design Glass, we challenged local high school art students to design a diorama inspired by one of our Kids Design Glass pieces. The three selected dioramas are currently on display in the Grand Hall through September 7, 2014. I interviewed Kenai Brazier, Courtney Cox , and Justin Kon, from Federal Way High School to find out more about the diorama they created for Tis Ausome Landshark Ausomeness.

Kenai Brazier, Courtney Cox, Kara Hatcher, Justin Kon, Jalal Lawrence, Elizabeth Abramchuk pose with their diorama

Kenai Brazier, Courtney Cox, Kara Hatcher, Justin Kon, Jalal Lawrence, Elizabeth Abramchuk pose with their diorama.

How did you make the Sea Cave featured in your diorama? It looks so realistic!

KB: For the bulk of the diorama we used pink insulation foam that was nailed together, and then sawed into the shapes we wanted it to be. After that we hand-carved into the foam with a heat knife, and sanded it with sandpaper. We dry-brushed the cliffs with a wide assortment of acrylic paint. Glitter Glue was then added to parts I knew I wanted the light to hit to create an underwater feel so that way it would separate it from the half with the Landshark on it.

Planks of foam were sculpted and then glued together to make the Sea Cave.

Planks of foam were sculpted and then glued together to make the Sea Cave.

What other materials did you use to create a realistic environment for your diorama?

JK: We used air dried clay to sculpt the mushrooms and the clam. We used a ping pong ball for the pearl. We used actual sand and pebbles for the sea floor; we also used a real clam shell. For our sea queen we used a Barbie.

Sand is carefully applied to make the sea floor.

Sand is carefully applied to make the sea floor.

Which part of the diorama are you most proud of?

JK:  It’s hard to choose just one when everything turned out so “ausome”, I am especially proud of how the cliff turned out since it was such a large task.

CC: The most challenging part of making the diorama was making sure everybody agreed on things like the structure.

KB: The Sea Queen….definitely the Sea Queen. Originally she was going to be cut out of the diorama because she would be a distraction from the Landshark. However, I fought for her to stay in the diorama because I thought that it was critical for our diorama to tell a story. In a story you need a plot, a conflict, and a meaningful ending. The Sea Queen ended up playing an important role in our diorama because of her critical role in our story. And, all of the hard work Kara put into making her  is what I believe put our diorama idea above the rest.

A 25lb weight was place on top of the diorama to make sure that the Sea Cave was strong enough to support the glass artwork.

A 25lb weight was place on top of the diorama to make sure that the Sea Cave was strong enough to support the glass artwork.

Who worked on the diorama? Which parts were they responsible for?

CC:  There were a total of six people in our team, Kenai Brazier, Courtney Cox, Kara Hatcher, Justin Kon, Jalal Lawrence, and  Elizabeth Abramchuk. Everybody pitched in to create the diorama and offered up ideas and solutions. Kenai did most of the designing. Kara did most of the work on the Sea Queen. Elizabeth did a lot of the painting; she helped paint the rocks, the cave, the throne and the mushrooms. Jalal helped with sanding and carving the foam. Justin helped a lot with the carving. He also, worked on the electronics. I mostly helped with sanding and painting.

Katie Phelps is the Curatorial Assistant/Visiting Artist Coordinator at Museum of Glass. She is an alumnus of Whitman College (BA) and University of Washington (MA). In her life outside of the Museum she is outside as much as possible, wearing skis as often as she does hiking boots.