MOG @ 20 Celebration and Blown Away Watch Party and Cast Q&A

This Saturday, July 30, MOG is celebrating its 20th birthday with an all-day MOG @ 20 celebration! From 10am-5pm, stop by the Museum for a variety of family-friendly activities, performances, and demonstrations. Then, from 5pm-6pm, join us in the Hot Shop Amphitheater for a watch party of the newest season of Netflix’s hit series Blown Away, followed by a live Q&A with local artists and Season 2 cast members Minhi England and Trenton Quiocho.

The celebration will take place both inside the building and outdoors, and Museum admission will be free to everyone all day long. Artisan vendors will host a market on the Museum’s outdoor Plaza. The Hot Shop Team will give live glassblowing demonstrations, as they work alongside Visiting Artist Tanner Weiss. Musical performances by the Kareem Kandi World Orchestra, the Tacoma Banjo Club, and the Pierce College Jazz Combo will take place throughout the day in the Grand Hall. The Museum of Glass Store is hosting Marble Mania, featuring flameworking demonstrations by Blake Julich, a marble painting activity, a marble run, and more. Incalmo will host a burger bar and sell special “Chocolate Marble” truffles as a birthday treat, for those who are peckish from all the partying.

To cap off the celebrations, Blown Away cast members Minhi England and Trenton Quiocho, both Pacific Northwest locals, will join visitors and MOG staff in the Hot Shop Amphitheater for a watch party of Blown Away: Season 3, Episode 1. After the episode, visitors are invited to join in conversation with the artists in a live Q&A session, moderated by MOG curator Katie Buckingham. Just like the rest of the day, this event is free to attend. Seating will be first come, first served (and could fill up quickly), so visitors are encouraged to arrive early. Snacks will be available for purchase and Incalmo will host a cash bar to accompany the watch party.

Thank you to our sponsors Port of Tacoma and ArtsWA for their support of this event.

TAKING IT TO THE STREETS: Pop-Up Glassblowing and Activities

Who doesn’t miss afternoons in the Hot Shop watching the Team in action? Well don’t worry, because for back-to-back weekends Museum of Glass is taking the Mobile Hot Shop to the streets! Starting August 28, MOG will be activating the outdoor plaza with live glassblowing, scavenger hunts, and artmaking activities from 12–3pm.

In addition to demos operated out of the Mobile Hot Shop, the Museum Store will be open and featuring new items for sale. The MOG Education staff will also host a limited amount of hands-on activities, which will vary by day and are free to participate. The activity schedule is as follows:

Friday, Aug. 28 & Sept. 4 – Creating coneheads: Color and decorate a vintage
conehead hat pattern.
Saturday, Aug. 29 & Sept. 5 – Painting on glass jars.

Sunday, Aug. 30 & Sept. 6 – Crafting suncatchers: Using recycled glass, create a 2D mosaic suncatcher to extend summer’s sunshine rays.

Join the Museum for some fun in the sun before the always short Washington summer ends. Members should also be sure to stop by the education table with your member card to receive a small token of gratitude for your support!

GLASS BREAK: Sarah Gilbert

Pride month may be over, but for the month of July, Glass Break will be highlighting LGBTQ+ artists ALL MONTH LONG. If you don’t know what Glass Break is, here’s a little background. Glass Break is a new video series exploring topics related to all things glass. This series includes interviews with the MOG Hot Shop Team discussing their experience working with the featured Visiting Artists, past clips of live glassblowing, and much more.

This week MOG’s own Sarah Gilbert will be featured with some throwback footage from her most recent residency in the Hot Shop.

Tune in Friday, July 10 at 1pm and enjoy a Glass Break with MOG!

View the live stream at: museumofglass.org/the-hot-shop

About the artist: Sarah Gilbert received her BFA from the Rochester Institute of Technology in 2005. Utilizing glass to communicate a narrative, Gilbert catalogs and documents the stories of daily life. Her work has been shown around the world and she was recently a Hauberg Fellow at Pilchuck Glass School. Gilbert was also chosen as part of Young Glass, the competitively juried international exhibition featuring the work of emerging artists working in glass, held once a decade at Glasmuseet Ebeltoft in Denmark.

Learn more about Gilbert and follow her work at:

Don’t call it a comeback….

That’s right folks, As the Pipe Turns, the one and only Museum of Glass blog is back to bring you all the glass-related information you didn’t know you needed. As the Museum adapts to these changing times the blog will become a place to continue exploring your passion for glass – including interviews with artists, behind the scenes details from the Curatorial team, community events, and more.

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Now more than ever, it is essential for MOG to continue igniting creativity, fueling discovery, and enriching lives through glass and glassmaking. While engagement with the Museum may look a little different, Museum of Glass remains a place to share and promote the importance of art in the community. So, please comment what YOU want to hear about and let’s get the conversation going.

Thank you for your continued support and be sure to follow As the Pipe Turns for upcoming post updates.

 

Lessons Learned Through Hot Shop Heroes

By Chad Widmer, Hot Shop Heroes student

In the Museum of Glass Hot Shop Heroes: Healing with Fire glassmaking classes, I’ve observed that there are a lot of life lessons in glassblowing. For example, always keep the glass turning and don’t let it get off center. If you keep turning when you are off center, you will get horribly out of shape! Let go of things that don’t go right—just make another one. Sometimes you just have to work with what you get. You can shape things when they are ready, but if they are not, you might break something if you force it. And, make gravity your friend—sound advice for any profession.

I suppose, what we veterans are doing in the Hot Shop Heroes program is art therapy. For me, it is making a difference. It’s been a long time since I’ve looked forward to anything. The civilian world is just different than the military world. I’ve been out for a while and it’s good to be around people who speak the same language again. I am genuinely happy to see everyone at the start of each Hot Shop Heroes session, and I am deeply disappointed if I miss one. We are working on teams again. We look out for each other by shielding with paddles, opening the furnace doors, and watching each other’s sculptures progress. Nothing beats seeing the genuine joy in someone’s eyes when they blow cap a bubble for the first time.

In my day job, I am a marine biologist at Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium (I used the GI Bill and Army College fund to pay for college). I designed and curated the jellyfish exhibition, which exemplifies jellyfish as living art. The exhibit is filled with jellyfish, paintings, sculpture, and music. Glass is of course a natural fit. I’ve been adding pieces we have made in class inside of my jellyfish displays.

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As I progress, I hope to add some amazing substrates for deep-sea creatures to live on—stay tuned. The thing I love most about working with glass is that with enough practice you can make anything you want. I love that freedom.

People sometimes say, “Thank you for your service.” I don’t know how to respond to that… but I can now sincerely say to the Museum of Glass Hot Shop Heroes program, “Thank you for making it worth it.”