Five Minutes with Bryan Kekst Brown

Bryan Kekst Brown is the Visiting Artist at Museum of Glass this week. Brown comes to the Hot Shop through the Museum’s Visiting Artist Residency application program, which invites artists from all over the world to apply.

Photo courtesy of Bryan Kekst Brown.
Photo courtesy of Bryan Kekst Brown.

Catch up with Brown before his residency begins!

My favorite medium to work with is…

Metal, for quite some time. Even more so as I have been exploring its malleability and the variety of metals that can be worked with. The difference between these various materials and their inherent properties fascinates me. Recently, since I have had access to a torch for working with borosilicate glass, I have really enjoyed  how tactile the medium is. I have read about the physical properties of glass but understanding those properties through your hands is a different experience.

The body of work I will be developing during my residency is…

Some of my recent work and taking it to a different level, in regards to scale. The work will also be slightly different in process or media, such as blowing into 3D printed cages without an exterior mold, documenting the electro-forming process as a video, and working with different physical processes to create an abstract definition of time.

I am most inspired by…

The phenomena that we experience as the physical world and how it operates based on a set of information.

I incorporate 3D-printed structures into my work by…

Designing 3D-printed cages to blow glass into. In the past I have used a plaster printer to print the actual blow mold. The cages fit into the blow mold and the glass takes the form of the mold as well as becoming stuck in the cage. The cages for this residency are designed with multiple layers to manipulate the way that the glass flows through.

In my spare time I…

Am currently trying to learn how to work with borosilicate glass. I try to get out into nature when I can as well, going on hikes or backpacking trips.

Plan a visit to Museum of Glass to see Visiting Artist Bryan Kekst Brown working in the Hot Shop from August 24 through 28, or watch his residency online.

Add “Every Soil Bears Not Everything” to Your Home

By Haley Judson, Marketing and Communications Intern

No trip to Museum of Glass is complete without browsing the gift shop. Celebrate the final weeks of the Museum’s exhibition Joey Kirkpatrick and Flora C. Mace: Every Soil Bears Not Everything with a nature-themed token to remind you of your visit.

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For those who want to learn more about the exhibition, open through September 6, and other works created by these two Studio Glass artists, pick up a copy of the Joey Kirkpatrick and Flora C. Mace catalogue for $55. Readers will enjoy the book’s discussion of their pieces that reflect the natural world, such as the artists’ Botanicals series.

Visitors should also check out the Museum Store’s selection of fruit that showcases vibrant colors seen in the exhibition. Want to add some fruit to your home? The yellow apple is $90 and the red apple is $65. Both are pictured above.

Although the Botanicals portion of the exhibition has closed, visitors are still treated to the artists’ floral designs found on their Alphabet Cylinders. Feeling the flower power? Check out the Store’s selection of glass flowers for your home. Our flowers come in all shapes and sizes, but I think this yellow flower, pictured above, in particular will remind you why Kirkpatrick and Mace are inspired by nature. These flowers are $50 each. Smaller flower sets are available in-store and online for $30.

Lastly, birds also play a prominent role in the exhibition. Add a little nature décor to your home with the Store’s variety of Global Village Glass Studio creatures. Choose from mini birds for $10 and lady bugs for $1.

Become a Museum of Glass member and save 10% every time you shop at the Museum Store. You’ll also enjoy extra seasonal discounts throughout the year!

Care and Handling of Artwork at Museum of Glass: Protection from Fire, Water, and Pests

By Rebecca Engelhardt, Collections and Exhibitions Manager

As part of our ongoing series on the care of artwork at Museum of Glass (MOG), this post reviews the methods that we use to protect our collections from fire, water, and pests.

The Curatorial department at MOG works closely with our colleagues in the Security and Facilities departments to monitor for the threat of fire, water, and pests.

Fire

Insuring that our smoke detectors and fire extinguishers are properly installed, accessible, and inspected lowers the threat of fire.

Deborah Oropallo, Untitled (from the Under Fire series), 2002. Collection of Museum of Glass
Deborah Oropallo, Untitled (from the Under Fire series), 2002. Collection of Museum of Glass

Careful storage of flammable chemicals in specially designed cabinets, like this one, isolates them away from the artwork we have on display and in storage.

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Leaks and Floods

Much like your own home, damage from rising groundwater or from broken plumbing is a risk to our collection. Undetected or remedied leaks or floods will result in water damage of objects, and could lead to mold, another thread to the collection.

Martin Blank, Fluent Steps, 2008. Extra care is taken to monitor the effects of the climate on this outdoor sculpture at the Museum. Our Curatorial staff works with engineers and conservators who are specially trained in this material.
Martin Blank, Fluent Steps, 2008. Extra care is taken to monitor the effects of the climate on this outdoor sculpture at the Museum. Our Curatorial staff works with engineers and conservators, who are specially trained in this material.

We monitor the building for any leaks and keep a fully-stocked set of disaster response supplies at hand.

You can build your own emergency kit for flooding and leaks, or purchase vendor pre-made kit like this one from University Products - http://www.universityproducts.com/cart.php?m=product_list&c=166
You can build your own emergency kit for flooding and leaks or purchase vendor pre-made kit like this one from University Products – http://www.universityproducts.com/cart.php?m=product_list&c=166

Covered display vitrines and storage shelving adds a layer of protection from leaks.

Masters of Studio Glass: Richard Meitner - 2009
Masters of Studio Glass: Richard Meitner – 2009

Pests

Pests are another risk that museums try to avoid. At MOG, we do not allow food, drinks, or potted plants in our galleries or storage areas, as these things all attract pests. We also ask that our custodial team stays on top of their housekeeping to deter vermin and insects.

Although most of the artwork at the Museum is glass (and not so tasty to pests), many pieces at the Museum include materials such as paper and wood. These are the organic materials that are easily damaged by pests.

This piece, Vanity, by Joseph Gregory Rossano is an prime example of mixed-media artwork that contains not only glass, but wood and paper that are a food source for many pests. Photo by Duncan Price.
This piece, Vanity, by Joseph Gregory Rossano is an prime example of mixed-media artwork that contains not only glass, but wood and paper that are a food source for many pests. Photo by Duncan Price.

Watch out for pests who would like to dine on the materials in your artwork!

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http://www.clker.com/clipart-15683.html
http://myfavoriteanimalpostcards.blogspot.com/2012/07/nage-tier-rodent-gerbil-or-hampster.html
http://myfavoriteanimalpostcards.blogspot.com/2012/07/nage-tier-rodent-gerbil-or-hampster.html

Stay tuned for more on caring for art at MOG!

For more from the Care and Handling of Artwork series, check out:

Rebecca Engelhardt is the Registrar/Collections Manager at Museum of Glass. Her background includes ten years at MOG, plus time at major museums such as Smithsonian Institution and The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art.

Lino Boats – A Rare Treat

By Greg Owen, Manager of Audience Engagement and Hot Shop Heroes 

Muranese Maestro Vetario (glass master) Lino Tagliapietra returns to the Museum of Glass Hot Shop this week with a very special project: boats. For those of you that are familiar with the way Lino usually works in our Hot Shop—jumping from piece to piece, series to series, taking time to craft small sake glasses or bowls along the way—watching the boats, from his Endeavor series, being made may seem quite different.

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Russell Johnson Photographer, Lino Tagliapietra Inc.
Russell Johnson Photographer, Lino Tagliapietra Inc.
Russell Johnson Photographer, Lino Tagliapietra Inc.

Lino is an incredibly hard worker. He is always the last one to leave the floor for lunch, sometimes skipping the meal all together and subsisting on a few slices of fruit, and maybe a few slices of Mortadella. Or, on the other extreme, he may decide to stop blowing and cook lunch for his entire team, which happened last year when he cooked a huge and delicious paella for the entire Hot Shop Team. It was magnifico!

Lino Cooking

Beyond the accumulated knowledge of the chef, paella is dependent on succulent, fresh seafood to be successful. This is where the boats come in. Lino’s home is in Murano, Italy, which is an island off the coast of Venice in the Venetian Lagoon. While the central islands that make up the heart of historical Venice are connected to mainland Italy by a rail and auto causeway, life in Murano can best be described by its relationship to the sea, and to glass.

Canal

Lino has said that his Dinosaur series was partially inspired by the marine life of canals and lagoon, which is readily apparent in the massive yet gracefully balanced forms. His boats are a more literal translation, but not necessarily of the familiar Venetian gondolas that you might imagine. Lino spoke with curator Annegreth Nill about the Endeavor series in The Art of Lino Tagliapietra: Concerto in Glass at Columbus Museum of Art in 2003.

“I had the idea to do boats for many years. I seriously started making them in 1995. The shape is very organic. I especially liked the boats designed by the Vikings. I also like many things about the canoe, not the canoe of the native North Americans, but of the people of the Amazon. (Such as Jeff Bezos, ed.) It has a very simple shape and a very long point.”

Russell Johnson Photographer, Lino Tagliapietra Inc.
Russell Johnson Photographer, Lino Tagliapietra Inc.

If you have never had the opportunity to see Lino creating boats from the Endeavor series, come down to Museum of Glass this weekend, July 30-31. The Museum will be open at 9 am on Saturday for members and 10 am for the general public. The Museum will open to everyone at 9 am on Sunday.

Greg Owen is the Manager of Audience Engagement and Hot Shop Heroes at Museum of Glass. Greg can be seen working the mic as the Hot Shop studio emcee, assisting Visiting Artists, and teaching soldiers how to blow glass during Hot Shop Heroes: Healing with Fire classes. 

Five Minutes with Karen Willenbrink-Johnsen

Visiting Artist Karen Willenbrink-Johnsen has often been inspired by the natural world, finding her creative spark through traveling, observing animals, and exploring the outdoors.

MOG caught up with the Visiting Artist ahead of her residency to ask a few questions about the inspiration behind her work and what she is looking forward to this week.

Karen Willenbrink-Johnsen working; Photo by Russell Johnson.
Karen Willenbrink-Johnsen working; Photo by Russell Johnson.

My favorite memory of exploring the outdoors is…

Well, any animal interaction puts me in “awe.” One event that stands out..My friend and I thought it would be great to take a mountain hike in April. After hours of pushing through the snow, we gave up the idea of making it to the top, so instead we climbed a boulder to catch some sun. While we were sitting there overlooking a snow covered meadow, a family of wolverines, two adults and two youngsters, came out and took turns sliding down the slope! Unforgettable and truly amazing!

I am inspired most by…

Besides kindness? And people who treat other people with dignity? And folks who stand up against hate? Other than that, natural history, rocks, plants, and animals. I can’t get over the glory of the natural works.

Karen Willenbrink-Johnsen; Peacock, 2015; Blown glass and steel; 26 x 35 x 16 inches; Photo by KP Studio.
Karen Willenbrink-Johnsen; Peacock, 2015; Blown glass and steel; 26 x 35 x 16 inches; Photo by KP Studio.

Collaborating with other artists has taught me…

To stay open. Be a sponge and soak up as much as I can.

If I could give my younger self one piece of advice about working with glass, it would be…

We all have our own path, trust in it. Live for your spirit. It is the only true wealth. Love life and live passionately.

During my residency, I am most looking forward to…

Sharing a vision, working with great people, a watching audience, a great shop, creating what I am passionate about!! HAPPY HAPPY JOY JOY HAPPY JOY HAPPY JOY JOY JOY!

Plan a visit to Museum of Glass to see Visiting Artist Karen Willenbrink-Johnsen working from July 13 through 17, or watch her residency online.