Tag Archives: April Surgent

#BeTheCurator

By Katie Phelps, Curatorial Assistant and Visiting Artist Coordinator

This January at MOG, we’re inviting all of our visitors to #BeTheCurator for our newest crowd-curated exhibition, which opened January 16.

Museum curators have a long tradition of being keepers of the past. Historically, they have been regarded as specialists responsible for the research and care of collections of objects. In the age of social media, the concept of curating has become an everyday occurrence. The Web is full of “curated” content that is selected, edited, and presented to represent specific concepts and ideas. Our interaction with Facebook, Pinterest, and countless other websites has made us all curators.

Last year, we invited visitors to use their social media curation skills to create an exhibition. Visitors viewed a selection of artwork from MOG’s collections, both in the Museum and on Facebook, and voted on which objects to display in #BeTheCurator. Our visitors left thoughtful comments and insights about their selections, and I wanted to share some of their thoughts on a few pieces from the exhibition.

David Huchthausen (American, born 1951) Triad, 2008 Constructed glass sculpture Collection of Museum of Glass, gift of Linda and Arthur Schwartz

David Huchthausen (American, born 1951)
Triad, 2008
Constructed glass sculpture
Collection of Museum of Glass, gift of Linda and Arthur Schwartz

“From whatever angle you look at it, you see a different color. From my perspective, at 11 o’clock, it looks like the colors make a Ying/Yang sign.” – Shayla (age 13, New York)

 

ARTWORK_Surgent

April Surgent (American, born 1982) But You Won’t Look Back, 2006 Fused and cameo-engraved glass Collection of Museum of Glass, purchase courtesy of Lisa and Dudley Anderson

“After reading about the artist, I like her depiction of how modern times has forgotten the past, and how she uses art to recreate the old into the new. Very inspiring!” – Marcus (age 24, New Jersey)

 

Lino Tagliapietra (Italian, born 1934) Manhattan Sunset, 1997 Blown glass with cane pick-ups, battuto and inciso cut; steel and glass Collection of Museum of Glass Photo by Duncan Price

Lino Tagliapietra (Italian, born 1934)
Manhattan Sunset, 1997
Blown glass with cane pick-ups, battuto and inciso cut; steel and glass
Collection of Museum of Glass
Photo by Duncan Price

“The delicacy of this old world process used in this most modern of installations/multiple pieces is unparalleled. The bonus is the title’s suggestion of an abstract skyline and plethora of colors a sunset can evoke.” – Marv Goldber (age 70, Tuscon)

 

Erich Woll (American, born 1970) Mistakes Will be Made (blue-footed Boobies), 2014 Hot-sculpted glass Collection of Museum of Glass, gift of the artist

Erich Woll (American, born 1970)
Mistakes Will be Made (blue-footed Boobies), 2014
Hot-sculpted glass
Collection of Museum of Glass, gift of the artist

“Art that brings us back to nature and shows the interdependence we have with the world around us is beautiful (and quite symbolic, being made of glass).” – Bethany (age 31, New Jersey)

 

Michael Sherrill (American, born 1955) Brightly Hidden, 2010 Hot-sculpted and flameworked glass, forged bronze and laminated colored porcelain Collection of Museum of Glass, gift of the artist

Michael Sherrill (American, born 1955)
Brightly Hidden, 2010
Hot-sculpted and flameworked glass, forged bronze and laminated colored porcelain
Collection of Museum of Glass, gift of the artist

“It’s beautiful! It’s a great nature piece. Glass is science, art, nature…and the natural subject of a flower and a snake fits the medium well.” – Chelsea (age 32, Olympia)

 

In the age of the Internet, we each have the power to construct and curate information on a whole new level. By broadening our definition of “curator,” the Museum of Glass staff is excited to share the power to construct narrative, highlight artwork, and shape artistic development with our visitors!

These objects, along with our other most “Liked” pieces, will be on display in #BeTheCurator now through October 23, 2016. We invite you to visit MOG and continue to be part of the Museum’s curatorial process. Each visitor gets to add their “Likes” to the pieces included in the exhibition! The artist who receives the most votes will be invited for a five-day Visiting Artist residency at Museum of Glass in 2017.

Katie Phelps is the Curatorial Assistant/Visiting Artist Coordinator at Museum of Glass. She is an alumnus of Whitman College (BA) and University of Washington (MA). In her life outside of the Museum she is outside as much as possible, wearing skis as often as she does hiking boots.   

Docent Traver Trip 2014

By Lena Gibson, Museum of Glass Docent

On a rainy Tuesday morning, five docents (Carol, Annette, Mary, Lysa, and I), two staff
members (Elisabeth and Bonnie), and two guests made our way to the Traver Gallery in Seattle using our Sound Transit bus system. We did not all ride the same bus, and in fact, two didn’t ride the bus at all. For those of us who did, it was a lot easier than driving, once we had figured out which bus to take, where to park, etc.

Bill Traver gave us an excellent tour of his gallery. We went to see two of our favorite artists, whose exhibits were closing soon. April Surgent spent time in Antarctica and used a time lapse technique with pinhole cameras to capture the light and ice and water and wildlife of the area. She then translated the images she captured into glass, using her unique technique of cameo carving into different colored layers of fused glass. She had made quite a few pieces for this exhibit and Mr. Traver told us each were sold already. 12

Then we went to another area of the gallery to look at the latest pieces from Preston Singletary, another favorite glass artist we were well acquainted with. In this exhibit, one of the new features were that there were pieces done in pastel colors, like golden yellow and salmon pink. There were three extremely large glass baskets that came with their own stands. Many of the hand sculpted figurines on Preston’s rattles now had the addition of locks of real human hair3456

It was interesting to see other works in the Traver Gallery, from Chihuly, Nancy Callhan, and many others. We were intrigued by fused cane works from Sean Albert.

We also went downstairs and around the corner to the Vetri Gallery. We saw some very nice pieces from Gabe Feenan, as well as many other nice works by different glass artists.

7

I took these photos, with the exception of the one with the pink and gold heads by Preston. That was taken by Mary Robinson.

After the galleries, most of us headed to Pike Grill Brewing Company for lunch and a chance to talk everything over. I learned a lot about Corning from Bonnie and her guest, Lee, who works there. The bus ride home was so much easier than a drive on I-5 south at that time of day.