Tacoma Museum District to Reopen to the Public Beginning September 25

After being given the option to reopen by Governor Inslee last month, the museums of the Tacoma Museum District – Washington State Historical Society, Tacoma Art Museum, Museum of Glass, LeMay – America’s Car Museum, Foss Waterway Seaport, and Children’s Museum of Tacoma – will begin opening their doors to the public starting September 25, 2020.

The reopening timelines, days of operation, and onsite protocols will vary from museum to museum, based on staffing and exhibit configurations. The museums recommend purchasing tickets online in advance. Visitors are encouraged to check each museum’s website for specifics before visiting.

Throughout the pandemic, the directors of the individual institutions have consulted with local experts and worked in concert to monitor local COVID-19 transmission rates and trends. The decision to reopen comes after thoughtful consideration for the safety of guests, staff, and volunteers, and in accordance with specific protocols established by Washington State, the Department of Labor & Industries, and the Department of Health. Among these protocols are universal mask-wearing, the addition of sanitizing stations throughout the facilities, one-way routes through galleries, monitored social distancing between groups, reduced occupancy, and enhanced cleaning schedules. Each museum has also installed safety features and procedures specific to their individual building layout.

Initially, some venues will operate with reduced schedules:

Museum of Glass: Opening Sept. 25; operating hours Friday through Sunday – 10 am to 5 pm

LeMay – America’s Car Museum: Opening Sept. 25; operating hours Friday through Sunday – 10 am to 5 pm

Washington State Historical Society: Opening date to be announced soon. Operating hours will be Tuesday through Sunday – 10 am to 5 pm with seniors-only hours Tuesdays 10 am to 12 pm (ages 65+). Initially, the Great Hall of Washington History (third floor) will be open and fifth floor galleries will remain closed for installation of new exhibitions; admission will be half price during this time. Tickets may be purchased online or using credit/debit card at the museum (cash will not be accepted).

Tacoma Art Museum: Opening Oct. 9; operating hours Friday through Sunday – 10 am to 5 pm

Foss Waterway Seaport: Opening Oct. 16; operating hours Fridays from 3 pm to 7 pm, Saturdays from 10 am to 2 pm, and Sundays from noon to 4 pm

Children’s Museum of Tacoma: Will remain closed until 2021 due to the hands-on, interactive nature of the galleries. Greentrike, the museum’s parent company, will continue to provide Distance Learning Camps and licensed child care for our community’s youngest children.

You can read the governor’s COVID-19 requirements for museums here: https://www.governor.wa.gov/sites/default/files/COVID19%20Phase%202%20and%203%20Museums%20Guidance.pdf?utm_medium=email&utm_source=govdelivery

You can find more information at the Tacoma Museum District’s Facebook page (@TacomaMuseums)and each museum’s website (www.WashingtonHistory.org, www.TacomaArtMuseum.org,www.MuseumofGlass.org, www.AmericasCarMuseum.org, https://fosswaterwayseaport.org/, and https://playtacoma.org). The museum teams look forward to seeing you again.

COVID-19 Emergency Relief: A Thank You From MOG

The past few months have brought deep challenges for nearly every individual and organization in communities around the world. The impact and extended closures related to COVID-19 for non-profit institutions like MOG is significant, but there is a bright side. The outpouring of support from community members, funders, and partners has been uplifting. 

We’d like to share our appreciation to the organizations that have provided financial aid during this time of uncertainty. Their support will allow the Museum to continue previous programming, create new virtual programs, and plan for a safe reopening. 

Below is a list of organizations who have donated to Museum of Glass for COVID-19 Emergency Relief:

 

ArtsFund: $10,000
To learn more about ArtsFund visit: artsfund.org

 

 

National Endowment for the Arts CARES Act: $50,000
To learn more about NEA visit: arts.gov

 

 

Art Alliance for Contemporary Glass: $7,500
To learn more about AACG visit: contempglass.org

 

Washington State Arts Commission: $2,000
To learn more about ArtsWA, visit: arts.wa.gov

 

Thank you all for your generous support.

 

When Will Tacoma Museum District Reopen?

Earlier this week, the Tacoma Museum District (TMD), which includes the Washington State Historical Society, Tacoma Art Museum, Foss Waterway Seaport, Children’s Museum of Tacoma, and LeMay – America’s Car Museum, and Museum of Glass, collectively addressed plans for reopening.

For now, all five organizations have chosen to stay “paused” and continue to monitor local conditions on a daily basis. While the buildings are closed, many staff are working remotely to provide enriching online presentations and activities, as well as providing extensive downloadable learning materials to engage with history, arts, and culture from home.

Follow the Tacoma Museum District Facebook page for district updates, and of course, check the MOG site for details on our plans.

Five Minutes with Lino Tagliapietra

The Maestro returns to the Museum of Glass Hot Shop, October 26 through 28, for his third Visiting Artist Residency of the year! We caught up with him before he and his team arrive in the Hot Shop next week.

Lino Tagliapietra in the Museum of Glass. Photo courtesy of Museum of Glass.

Lino Tagliapietra in the Museum of Glass. Photo courtesy of Museum of Glass.

This is your third residency at Museum of Glass this year! Our visitors really enjoy seeing you work in the Hot Shop. What do you enjoy most about working at Museum of Glass?

What I really like about working at MOG is blowing glass with the Team in the Hot Shop!

How does the atmosphere of the hot shop shape your work?

What really shaped my way of working is the freedom that you can feel in the hot shop.

What advice do you have for aspiring glass artists?

I would love to tell them just three words: freedom, courage, and…a dash of luck!

Now for some fun questions. What is the first thing you do when you travel back to Italy?

The first thing I do when I go back to Murano is eat a plate of spaghetti with Italian broccolini. So good!

Which place has the best coffee – Seattle or Murano?

I like both, but at the moment I am missing the Murano one!

What is your favorite meal to cook for family and friends?

I love making sea snail soup. I like soup (sopa in the Venice dialect).

Plan a visit to Museum of Glass to see Visiting Artist Lino Tagliapietra working in the Hot Shop from October 26 through 28, or watch his residency online.

Behind the Gray Walls: Installing Into the Deep

By Katie Buckingham, Assistant Curator

Most of my job is a lot like every other office job. My desk is in a cubicle, and I usually spend my days attending meetings and hopping between Word, Excel, and Microsoft Office. But, one of my favorite parts of my job is when I get to escape my desk and step behind our gray temporary walls to install the art in our exhibitions.

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Working on one of our newest exhibitions, Into the Deep, is one of my favorite projects so far – partially because the work in the exhibition presented some interesting challenges, and partially (ok, mostly) because it is a show I’ve been working on curating for almost two years. It was an amazing experience to finally meet artwork I had only seen in photos and to stand in 3D space that I had only been visualizing on paper.

One of my curatorial goals was to give visitors a sense of the diverse number of ways you can use glass to make art. To fulfill this goal I looked for artwork that was as different as possible from the hand-sculpted vase or bowl many you probably have at home. This goal had a fun side-effect for me – several of the pieces in the exhibition presented our Curatorial team with some unique installation challenges.

Blue Dome, by Seattle-based artist Kait Rhoads, is a giant (almost 9-foot tall) dome covered with individual blue glass scales. Visitors are encouraged to stand inside the dome and look up to feel like they are standing underwater.

Kait Rhoads (American, born 1995). Blue Dome, 1995. Single-strength plate glass, cut, drilled and fired with glass enamels; Courtesy of the artist.

Kait Rhoads (American, born 1995). Blue Dome, 1995. Single-strength plate glass, cut, drilled and fired with glass enamels; Courtesy of the artist.

Fortunately, we didn’t have to attach each of the scales individually. The dome structure is made from a sturdy, steel frame. Kait Rhoads created a system where sheets of scales (attached individually to chicken wire) could be hung in sections across the metal frame.

Artist Kait Rhoads (in center of dome) works with MOG art handler Elizabeth Mauro to connect a section of glass scales to the steel frame. On the left of the frame, you can see small tags that are used to mark the connection points for the sections of scales.

Artist Kait Rhoads (in center of dome) works with MOG art handler Elizabeth Mauro to connect a section of glass scales to the steel frame. On the left of the frame, you can see small tags that are used to mark the connection points for the sections of scales.

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Art installation is definitely a team effort. Here, Rebecca Engelhardt (MOG’s Exhibition/Collections Manager) and Kait Rhoads hold a section of scales on the outside of the dome, while art handler Elizabeth Mauro secures the section to the frame with wire.

It took a team of 4 people almost 6 hours to install Blue Dome.

It took a team of four people almost six hours to install Blue Dome.

Two Seas, by Shayna Leib is another piece which took a whole team to hang on the wall. Leib is an avid scuba diver, and each of the frames in this piece represent species of coral, sea grass, or anemone seen through the lens of her underwater camera. Each of the frames is teeming with life, made from fragile, individually-sculpted pieces of glass.

Shayna Leib (Americna, born 1975). Two Seas, 2012. Glass, silver leaf and resin; Courtesy of the artist. Photo by Eric Tadsen.

Shayna Leib (Americna, born 1975). Two Seas, 2012. Glass, silver leaf and resin; Courtesy of the artist. Photo by Eric Tadsen.

Each of the picture frames arrived carefully packed in individual boxes, which were shipped together in a large, padded wooden crate. We unpacked and cleaned each piece of glass, using Q-Tips, glass cleaner, and canned air to dust the crevices between each glass tentacle.

A large table is set up in the galleries so each piece can be cleaned and prepared to hang on the wall.

A large table is set up in the galleries so each piece can be cleaned and prepared to hang on the wall.

Parts of Two Seas were so detailed that we had to use Q-Tips to make sure all of the surfaces were sparkly and clean. Leib uses tweezers to set each piece of glass individually into resin, and in doing so creates the effect of the individually drifting tentacles of anemones.

Parts of Two Seas were so detailed that we had to use Q-Tips to make sure all of the surfaces were sparkly and clean. Leib uses tweezers to set each piece of glass individually into resin, and in doing so creates the effect of the individually drifting tentacles of anemones.

Often, artists will provide a template along with the artwork, so that we can hang a piece on the wall to their specifications. This is especially important for a piece like Two Seas, where the frames have to hang in a grid, but close enough together so that some of the glass tentacles from adjacent frames have the appearance of overlapping with each other.

MOG art handler Elizabeth Mauro marks the template for on the wall. By hanging the template on the wall using a level, she is able to push a nail through the paper template, leaving a mark on the wall where each mount needs to be attached.

MOG art handler Elizabeth Mauro marks the template for on the wall. By hanging the template on the wall using a level, she is able to push a nail through the paper template, leaving a mark on the wall where each mount needs to be attached.

Each of the framed glass pieces is attached to the wall using a french cleat. A french cleat is made from two pieces of wood, cut at a corresponding angle. One half of the cleat is attached to the wall, and the other to the top of the piece of artwork (see diagram below). The wood is cut at a steep angle, which act like two puzzle pieces, locking together to secure the artwork to the wall.

The diagonal cut in a French cleat creates two puzzle pieces which lock together to secure the artwork on the wall.

The diagonal cut in a french cleat creates two puzzle pieces which lock together to secure the artwork on the wall.

Elizabeth attaches the French cleat for piece #3 to the wall, and double-checks that it is level. The small pieces of blue tape are points marked from the template where the other French cleats will be attached.

Elizabeth attaches the french cleat for piece #3 to the wall, and double-checks that it is level. The small pieces of blue tape are points marked from the template where the other French cleats will be attached.

After all of the french cleats are attached to the wall, we can hang each of the frames. Here, Elizabeth is wearing gloves to keep the glass clean.

After all of the french cleats are attached to the wall, we can hang each of the frames. Here, Elizabeth is wearing gloves to keep the glass clean.

Halfway finished! Two Seas is made of 13 framed glass compositions, which are each hung individually to the wall. Each frame is assigned a unique number, so we know which frame goes where, as well as which french cleat to use.

Halfway finished! Two Seas is made of 13 framed glass compositions, which are each hung individually to the wall. Each frame is assigned a unique number, so we know which frame goes where, as well as which french cleat to use.

Now complete, Two Seas is featured on the title wall of Into the Deep.

Now complete, Two Seas is featured on the title wall of Into the Deep.

These two pieces are just the tip of the iceberg (or should I say reef). I hope you can come down to Museum of Glass and dive on into the rest of the exhibition. Into the Deep is open through September 2017. Check out our calendar at http://museumofglass.org/event-calendar to learn more about events and activities related to the exhibition.

Katie Buckingham is the Assistant Curator at Museum of Glass. She is an alumnus of Whitman College (BA) and University of Washington (MA). In her life outside of the Museum she is outside as much as possible, wearing skis as often as she does hiking boots.