Add “Every Soil Bears Not Everything” to Your Home

By Haley Judson, Marketing and Communications Intern

No trip to Museum of Glass is complete without browsing the gift shop. Celebrate the final weeks of the Museum’s exhibition Joey Kirkpatrick and Flora C. Mace: Every Soil Bears Not Everything with a nature-themed token to remind you of your visit.

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For those who want to learn more about the exhibition, open through September 6, and other works created by these two Studio Glass artists, pick up a copy of the Joey Kirkpatrick and Flora C. Mace catalogue for $55. Readers will enjoy the book’s discussion of their pieces that reflect the natural world, such as the artists’ Botanicals series.

Visitors should also check out the Museum Store’s selection of fruit that showcases vibrant colors seen in the exhibition. Want to add some fruit to your home? The yellow apple is $90 and the red apple is $65. Both are pictured above.

Although the Botanicals portion of the exhibition has closed, visitors are still treated to the artists’ floral designs found on their Alphabet Cylinders. Feeling the flower power? Check out the Store’s selection of glass flowers for your home. Our flowers come in all shapes and sizes, but I think this yellow flower, pictured above, in particular will remind you why Kirkpatrick and Mace are inspired by nature. These flowers are $50 each. Smaller flower sets are available in-store and online for $30.

Lastly, birds also play a prominent role in the exhibition. Add a little nature décor to your home with the Store’s variety of Global Village Glass Studio creatures. Choose from mini birds for $10 and lady bugs for $1.

Become a Museum of Glass member and save 10% every time you shop at the Museum Store. You’ll also enjoy extra seasonal discounts throughout the year!

Making Treasure-trove

By Katie Phelps, Curatorial Assistant and Visiting Artist Coordinator

Our upcoming exhibition Into the Deep takes a look at glass artists who are inspired by the ocean. Glass is an incredible medium, and it allows artists to capture the effects of being underwater better than any other artistic medium.

Last November, artists Kelly O’Dell and Raven Skyriver collaborated on a series of barnacle-encrusted shells, which will be featured in the exhibition, in the Museum of Glass Hot Shop. The complex process is a great example how versatile the medium of glass can be.

The stripes on the clamshell begin as flattened pieces of cane (colored glass) which are heated until they are hot enough to stick together. Here, Nick Davis, MOG’s Hot Shop Tech, is squeezing the hot pieces of cane together so they form a flat panel.
The stripes on the clamshell begin as flattened pieces of cane (colored glass) which are heated until they are hot enough to stick together. Here, Nick Davis, MOG’s Hot Shop Tech, is squeezing the hot pieces of cane together so they form a flat panel.
Next, artist Raven Skyriver picks up the stripes of cane using a piece of hot, clear glass shaped like a plunger. The hot clear glass sticks to the flat panel of cane, and forms a half dome shape. The clear appendage will be used to shape the flat stripes of color into a bubble.
Next, artist Raven Skyriver picks up the stripes of cane using a piece of hot, clear glass shaped like a plunger. The hot clear glass sticks to the flat panel of cane, and forms a half dome shape. The clear appendage will be used to shape the flat stripes of color into a bubble.
After the flattened cane is picked up onto the plunger, Skyriver uses a pair of shears to trim away the excess glass along the edge of the circle created by the plunger, sealing it into a clear glass dome with a colorful, striped base.
After the flattened cane is picked up onto the plunger, Skyriver uses a pair of shears to trim away the excess glass along the edge of the circle created by the plunger, sealing it into a clear glass dome with a colorful, striped base.

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The newly-formed dome is heated in the glory hole, and then rolled across a steel table called a marver to create a smooth bubble that is half clear glass, and half colored cane stripes.
The newly-formed dome is heated in the glory hole, and then rolled across a steel table, called a marver,  to create a smooth bubble that is half clear glass, and half colored cane stripes.
In order to start making the clam shape, the colored stripes need to be removed from their clear glass holder. The stripe canes are pinched inward to form their own bubble, and then connected to another blowpipe, so that they can be separated from the clear glass, and blown into a clamshell shape.
In order to start making the clam shape, the colored stripes need to be removed from their clear glass holder. The stripe canes are pinched inward to form their own bubble, and then connected to another blowpipe, so that they can be separated from the clear glass, and blown into a clamshell shape.
Tah-dah! After about 45 minutes of adding more clear molten glass, inflating the bubble by breathing into the blowpipe, and carefully sculpting the shape with tools, the bubble is beginning to look more like a clamshell. You can see the stripes from the cane, which have stretched and curved as the glass has been shaped.
Tah-dah! After about 45 minutes of adding more clear molten glass, inflating the bubble by exhaling into the blowpipe, and carefully sculpting the shape with tools, the bubble is beginning to look more like a clamshell. You can see the stripes from the cane, which have stretched and curved as the glass has been shaped.
Hot Shop Team member Sarah Gilbert transfers the piece from the bench, where the artists are working, to the gloryhole for it to be heated back up to above 900 degrees Fahrenheit. This is important to keep the glass from cooling too quickly and cracking.
Hot Shop Team member Sarah Gilbert transfers the piece from the bench, where the artists are working, to the gloryhole for it to be heated back up to above 900 degrees Fahrenheit. This is important to keep the glass from cooling too quickly and cracking.
After the artists are satisfied with the shape of the clamshell, it is time to attach the barnacles. These fabulous acorn barnacles are also made of glass. They were created ahead of time by Kelly O’Dell, and in then placed in a furnace in the Hot Shop called the garage – named because pieces are heated to 900 degrees and “parked” at that temperature until they are ready to be used.
After the artists are satisfied with the shape of the clamshell, it is time to attach the barnacles. These fabulous acorn barnacles are also made of glass. They were created ahead of time by Kelly O’Dell, and in then placed in a furnace in the Hot Shop calls the garage – named because pieces are heated to 900 degrees and “parked” at that temperature until they are ready to be used.
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Just before the barnacles are placed on the clamshell, they are loaded onto a pastorale (a flat, metal tray) and heated in the gloryhole to make them the same temperature as the shell.
Kelly O’Dell attaches a heated barnacle to the clamshell using a pair of tweezers. A torch is being used to keep the rest of the glass at the same temperature. Kelly also has a torch which she is using to heat the bottom of the barnacle so the hot glass can stick to the surface of the clamshell.
Kelly O’Dell attaches a heated barnacle to the clamshell using a pair of tweezers. A torch is being used to keep the rest of the glass at the same temperature. Kelly also has a torch which she is using to heat the bottom of the barnacle so the hot glass can stick to the surface of the clamshell.
After the barnacles are applied the whole piece is heated back up in the gloryhole.
After the barnacles are applied, the whole piece is heated back up in the gloryhole.
Now that all of the barnacles have been placed on the shell, the piece is complete. Water is dripped onto the end of the piece, which causes a crack to form where the piece meets the punty (the metal rod it is connected to) and allows the piece to be broken off of the pipe.
Now that all of the barnacles have been placed on the shell, the piece is complete. Water is dripped onto the end of the piece, which causes a crack to form where the piece meets the punty (the metal rod it is connected to) and allows the piece to be broken off of the pipe.
Success! The finished piece is rushed to an annealer, so that it can be cooled slowly overnight to room temperature.
Success! The finished piece is rushed to an annealer, so that it can be cooled slowly overnight to room temperature.
Kelly O’Dell (American, born 1973) and Raven Skyriver (American, born 1982); Treasure-trove, 2016; Blown and sculpted glass; 12 x 16 x 13 inches (30.5 x 40.6 x 33 cm); Courtesy of the artists; Photo by Kp Studios.
After the piece is completely cooled, it is coldworked to add texture to the surface of the shell, and a mount is made. Photo credit: Kelly O’Dell (American, born 1973) and Raven Skyriver (American, born 1982); Treasure-trove, 2016; Blown and sculpted glass; 12 x 16 x 13 inches (30.5 x 40.6 x 33 cm); Courtesy of the artists; Photo by Kp Studios.

The finished piece, Treasure-trove, will be one of the many ocean-inspired pieces featured in Into the Deep. The exhibition opens September 24, 2016. Come check it out!

Thanks to Alex Grümmer for the awesome Hot Shop photos!

Katie Phelps is the Curatorial Assistant/Visiting Artist Coordinator at Museum of Glass. She is an alumnus of Whitman College (BA) and University of Washington (MA). In her life outside of the Museum she is outside as much as possible, wearing skis as often as she does hiking boots.   

Memories from the Other Side of the Desk

By Max Fosberg, Visitor Services Manager

As my time comes to a close at Museum of Glass (only two more days, but who’s counting?), I have been taking some time to reflect on the past two years here working in the visitor services department. The journey has been exactly that, a journey with peaks and valleys.

But who wants to talk about valleys, low points, the dark ages?

Yeah, neither do I! So I made a list. Yes, the plain old top-something list. These are the top three moments for me working here at Museum of Glass. Ready? Set? GO!!

Moment 3: 2016 Slider Cook-Off

Once I leave the Museum, I plan on every once in a while coming back to check out a new exhibition, see one of my favorite artists in the Hot Shop, or just to simply say hello to old co-workers. However, there will be a day in March every year that you can count on me being at the Museum, and that will be the day of the annual Slider Cook-Off, which has to be one of the coolest, most exciting events in town.

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Slider Cook-Off participant WildFin won the 2016 Grand Prize with their slider.

This past March, Slider took a turn for the best. The burgers were out of this world, The Dusty 45s rocked the Grand Hall, artist John Miller was at the top of his game, and there was fun stuff to do at the event, like get an up-do hairstyle or see how many friends you can get in one picture at the free photo booth. I was working the event, but still had a better time than most events I have attended. As the guest that I will be next year, I’m so excited for this event that I’m considering buying VIP tickets! If you have never checked out Slider Cook-Off, and you like burgers, beer, and rock ‘n’ roll, you need to get a ticket!

Moment 2: Discovering and Meeting Lino Tagliapietra

Lino Tagliapietra, the Maestro of glassblowing. He is the greatest, and to this day, in his 80s, he is still the man on the floor shaping the glass, blowing the glass, and swinging the glass over his head.

Photo by Russell Johnson.
Lino Tagliapietra in the Museum of Glass Hot Shop; Photo by Russell Johnson.

I have had the privilege of watching Lino multiple times over the past two years, and he blows me away every time he steps onto the Hot Shop floor. I have also talked with him personally and helped him here at the Museum, and from that experience I am happy to report that he is incredibly humble and views glassblowing as “just my job.” He is a special, special person and has given so much to the glass art form for over 70 years – he started blowing glass when he was 11! That alone blows my mind and demands respect. Long live the king of glass and I hope I get to watch him for many more years to come.

Moment 1: John Kiley and Lino Tagliapietra in the Hot Shop

When I joined the Museum two years ago, I had no knowledge of glass art. Since then, I’ve had the opportunity to really examine and create an opinion about glass art. I am not an expert to say the least, however, I do know what I like and what I don’t like. Two of my favorite artists came together in the Hot Shop this past February, and I have to admit I “geeked” out over these two.

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Maestro Lino Tagliapietra (left) and Erich Woll (right) assist Visiting Artist John Kiley (center).

First, John Kiley. The spherical forms he makes, with chunks missing and two different color tones, really stand out to me as something from the future. And what can you pair with an emerging star? How about a living legend, the Maestro himself, Lino Tagliapietra. At a mere 81 years young, Lino is the Michael Jordan of glassblowing. He continues to create work year after year and does it with class and veteran savviness (I wrote about him in Moment 2, I know, cop out). This truly was a special week to be at the Museum, to see these two working together.

Well there it is, everyone. The list.

Honestly, the best thing about MOG is the people who work here. There is a wonderful team of passionate and creative people who make sure that this icon of Tacoma continues to educate the public about glass art. As someone who started working at the Museum with little knowledge of glass art, I feel pretty lucky to have had a two-year course in glass from some of the best people in the northwest. I urge you to keep coming down to MOG, and bring everyone you know!

I want to thank everyone who I have had the pleasure of working with and I hope to keep in contact with this group for years to come. Thank you MOG.

As Seen on TV

By Alex Carr, Communications Manager

This week, Museum of Glass took to Puget Sound television screens to discuss some of the Museum’s April exhibitions and events.

On KING5’s New Day Northwest, Hot Shop Heroes Lead Instructor, Patricia Davidson, sat down with Sergeant First Class Peter Bazo to talk about Healing in Flames, which closes this month.

Watch their segment and plan a visit to see the exhibition, on display through April 24.

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Also on television this week: Curator of Education and Community Engagement, Bonnie Wright.

Bonnie joined Tahoma Audubon Executive Director, Krystal Kyer, on TV Tacoma’s CityLine morning show to discuss the upcoming Mirrored Murrelets event on Thursday, April 21.

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The two organizations are working together to offer visitor an opportunity to learn about art and birds at Museum of Glass during Third Thursday. From 6 to 7:30 pm, learn more about the art, science, and policy surrounding the plight of the marbled murrelet, a sea bird that nests in the forests of the Pacific Coast. Following the panel discussion, take a tour of Joey Kirkpatrick and Flora C. Mace: Every Soil Bears Not Everything, which features an entire gallery devoted to birds. Admission is free!

Watch their CityLine segment here (beginning around the 45 minute mark).

Alex Carr is the Communications Manager at Museum of Glass. When she’s not circulating the Hot Shop floor trying to get the perfect Instagram shot for the Museum, you’ll find her baking at home, running at Green Lake, or exploring Washington’s wineries.

#BeTheCurator

By Katie Phelps, Curatorial Assistant and Visiting Artist Coordinator

This January at MOG, we’re inviting all of our visitors to #BeTheCurator for our newest crowd-curated exhibition, which opened January 16.

Museum curators have a long tradition of being keepers of the past. Historically, they have been regarded as specialists responsible for the research and care of collections of objects. In the age of social media, the concept of curating has become an everyday occurrence. The Web is full of “curated” content that is selected, edited, and presented to represent specific concepts and ideas. Our interaction with Facebook, Pinterest, and countless other websites has made us all curators.

Last year, we invited visitors to use their social media curation skills to create an exhibition. Visitors viewed a selection of artwork from MOG’s collections, both in the Museum and on Facebook, and voted on which objects to display in #BeTheCurator. Our visitors left thoughtful comments and insights about their selections, and I wanted to share some of their thoughts on a few pieces from the exhibition.

David Huchthausen (American, born 1951) Triad, 2008 Constructed glass sculpture Collection of Museum of Glass, gift of Linda and Arthur Schwartz
David Huchthausen (American, born 1951)
Triad, 2008
Constructed glass sculpture
Collection of Museum of Glass, gift of Linda and Arthur Schwartz

“From whatever angle you look at it, you see a different color. From my perspective, at 11 o’clock, it looks like the colors make a Ying/Yang sign.” – Shayla (age 13, New York)

 

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April Surgent (American, born 1982) But You Won’t Look Back, 2006 Fused and cameo-engraved glass Collection of Museum of Glass, purchase courtesy of Lisa and Dudley Anderson

“After reading about the artist, I like her depiction of how modern times has forgotten the past, and how she uses art to recreate the old into the new. Very inspiring!” – Marcus (age 24, New Jersey)

 

Lino Tagliapietra (Italian, born 1934) Manhattan Sunset, 1997 Blown glass with cane pick-ups, battuto and inciso cut; steel and glass Collection of Museum of Glass Photo by Duncan Price
Lino Tagliapietra (Italian, born 1934)
Manhattan Sunset, 1997
Blown glass with cane pick-ups, battuto and inciso cut; steel and glass
Collection of Museum of Glass
Photo by Duncan Price

“The delicacy of this old world process used in this most modern of installations/multiple pieces is unparalleled. The bonus is the title’s suggestion of an abstract skyline and plethora of colors a sunset can evoke.” – Marv Goldber (age 70, Tuscon)

 

Erich Woll (American, born 1970) Mistakes Will be Made (blue-footed Boobies), 2014 Hot-sculpted glass Collection of Museum of Glass, gift of the artist
Erich Woll (American, born 1970)
Mistakes Will be Made (blue-footed Boobies), 2014
Hot-sculpted glass
Collection of Museum of Glass, gift of the artist

“Art that brings us back to nature and shows the interdependence we have with the world around us is beautiful (and quite symbolic, being made of glass).” – Bethany (age 31, New Jersey)

 

Michael Sherrill (American, born 1955) Brightly Hidden, 2010 Hot-sculpted and flameworked glass, forged bronze and laminated colored porcelain Collection of Museum of Glass, gift of the artist
Michael Sherrill (American, born 1955)
Brightly Hidden, 2010
Hot-sculpted and flameworked glass, forged bronze and laminated colored porcelain
Collection of Museum of Glass, gift of the artist

“It’s beautiful! It’s a great nature piece. Glass is science, art, nature…and the natural subject of a flower and a snake fits the medium well.” – Chelsea (age 32, Olympia)

 

In the age of the Internet, we each have the power to construct and curate information on a whole new level. By broadening our definition of “curator,” the Museum of Glass staff is excited to share the power to construct narrative, highlight artwork, and shape artistic development with our visitors!

These objects, along with our other most “Liked” pieces, will be on display in #BeTheCurator now through October 23, 2016. We invite you to visit MOG and continue to be part of the Museum’s curatorial process. Each visitor gets to add their “Likes” to the pieces included in the exhibition! The artist who receives the most votes will be invited for a five-day Visiting Artist residency at Museum of Glass in 2017.

Katie Phelps is the Curatorial Assistant/Visiting Artist Coordinator at Museum of Glass. She is an alumnus of Whitman College (BA) and University of Washington (MA). In her life outside of the Museum she is outside as much as possible, wearing skis as often as she does hiking boots.