Temporary Museum Closure: How to Stay Connected and Support MOG

Per the direction of Washington state governor Jay Inslee, Museum of Glass is closed through Monday, December 14, 2020 to help curb the spread of COVID-19. We’re saddened to close our doors after just 45 days of reopening, but we’re committed to doing our part in protecting the health and safety of our community and staff.

However, there is good news.

While in-person Museum operations are impacted, there are other, dare we say, great ways to connect with and show your support for MOG.

Museum Store
The MOG Store remains open Friday–Sunday, 10am–5pm. Online shopping is also available at museumofglassstore.org and new products will be dropping over the next days and weeks, so check back often.

In addition, you can get your holiday crafting on with one of our free project kits for dreidels, snowflakes, and candy canes. Pick up yours in the Museum Store starting November 27, 2020.

Junior Curator Academy
Introducing Junior Curator Academy, an interactive mini-series focusing on art objects and installations at Museum of Glass. Listen in as our hosts talk to artists, Museum staff, and subject matter experts as they explore the creative process, influences, and materials used in individual works of art you can find at the Museum.

New Exhibition Alert
Previously scheduled to open on November 27, 2020, René Lalique: Art Deco Gems from the Steven and Rosyln Shulman Collection, will be on view when MOG reopens to the public. Don’t worry, you won’t have to wait that long for a sneak peek. Stay tuned for an opportunity to take a virtual look at this highly anticipated exhibition.

Glass Break
Continue to tune into Glass Break every Monday to watch clips of live glassblowing in the MOG Hot Shop with narration by Emcee Walter Lieberman.

You’ll hear more from us soon. Stay safe and we’ll get through this together. 

The Robert M. Minkoff Collection Gifted to Museum of Glass

Karen LaMonte (American, born 1967)
Child’s Dress, 2007
Kiln cast glass
18 × 21 × 20 in.
Collection of Museum of Glass, gift of Robert M. Minkoff Foundation

Museum of Glass is honored to announce that we received a seminal collection of artwork showcasing the development of glass as a studio and contemporary art medium from the Robert M. Minkoff Foundation. Adding these 400 works of art from Robert Minkoff’s personal collection makes the Museum’s glass holdings the largest in the Western United States.

We are honored and grateful to receive this gift from the Minkoff Foundation. This is the first major Studio Glass collection given to the Museum and it is transformational for us. Its comprehensive representation of glass artists, both nationally and internationally, provides a foundation for MOG to tell vital stories of studio and contemporary glass.

– Debbie Lenk, Executive Director

William Morris (American, born 1957)
Petroglyph Vessel, Turquoise Lip Wrap, 1987
Hand blown glass with glass powders
11 × 25 × 25 in.
Collection of Museum of Glass, gift of Robert M. Minkoff Foundation

Minkoff was a collector, a collector that celebrated the incredible diversity of glass art and its possibilities in the field of contemporary art. His passion and collecting philosophy complements Museum of Glass, which makes this gift so special to us. Minkoff’s collection includes several incredible artists, such as Jaroslava Brychtová, Stanislav Libenský, Klaus Moje, Debora Moore, William Morris, Paul Stankard, Therman Statom, and Lino Tagliapietra. The collection also provides a look at innovative new approaches to the material by artists including Steffan Dam, Luke Jerram, Silvia Levenson, Beth Lipman, and Karen LaMonte.

MOG will celebrate this significant gift with a major exhibition honoring Minkoff and his collection, with accompanying educational programming, opening in Spring 2022. It will be accompanied by a catalog highlighting the breadth of the collection.

Currently, you can view A Glimpse at the Robert M. Minkoff Foundation Collection at Museum of Glass. This installation opened on October 15 and is proudly displayed in our Grand Hall.

To learn more about The Robert M. Minkoff Collection, view the full press release at: The Robert M. Minkoff Collection Gifted to Museum of Glass

TAKING IT TO THE STREETS: Pop-Up Glassblowing and Activities

Who doesn’t miss afternoons in the Hot Shop watching the Team in action? Well don’t worry, because for back-to-back weekends Museum of Glass is taking the Mobile Hot Shop to the streets! Starting August 28, MOG will be activating the outdoor plaza with live glassblowing, scavenger hunts, and artmaking activities from 12–3pm.

In addition to demos operated out of the Mobile Hot Shop, the Museum Store will be open and featuring new items for sale. The MOG Education staff will also host a limited amount of hands-on activities, which will vary by day and are free to participate. The activity schedule is as follows:

Friday, Aug. 28 & Sept. 4 – Creating coneheads: Color and decorate a vintage
conehead hat pattern.
Saturday, Aug. 29 & Sept. 5 – Painting on glass jars.

Sunday, Aug. 30 & Sept. 6 – Crafting suncatchers: Using recycled glass, create a 2D mosaic suncatcher to extend summer’s sunshine rays.

Join the Museum for some fun in the sun before the always short Washington summer ends. Members should also be sure to stop by the education table with your member card to receive a small token of gratitude for your support!

ArtsWA: Fueling the Fire for Hot Shop Heroes

thumbnail_logo-artswa-washington-state-arts-commission-2Just as we were getting ready to close Museum of Glass to slow the spread of COVID-19 we received some great news from the Washington State Arts Commission (ArtsWA), an organization that has been promoting the value of arts in Washington communities since 1961.

The Washington State Arts Commission, through its partnership with Creative Forces*, has provided MOG’s Hot Shop Heroes™ program with a $1,400 grant to purchase tools, molds and glass for the Museum’s new Hot Shop Heroes Advanced Production Class, which launched in January 2020. Through this award, Hot Shop Heroes was also able to purchase a customized mold for signing glass art pieces created during the class. Members of the class are learning how to create salable glass art for the Museum of Glass store. The Advanced Production Class gives participants a chance to pay-it-forward. Proceeds generated from the sale of these items benefit the Hot Shop Heroes program.

Since 2013 MOG’s Hot Shop Heroes program has offered glassmaking classes for soldiers and veterans with post-traumatic stress and traumatic brain injury. Museum of Glass partners with the Warrior Transition Battalion and the Intrepid Spirit Center at Joint Base Lewis-McChord and the Washington State Department of Veterans Affairs.

To learn more about ArtsWA visit: arts.wa.gov

thumbnail_th*Creative Forces: NEA Military Healing Arts Network is an initiative of the National Endowment for the Arts in partnership with the U.S. Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs and the state and local arts agencies that seeks to improve the health, wellness, and quality of life for military and veteran populations exposed to trauma, as well as their families and caregivers.

Lessons Learned Through Hot Shop Heroes

By Chad Widmer, Hot Shop Heroes student

In the Museum of Glass Hot Shop Heroes: Healing with Fire glassmaking classes, I’ve observed that there are a lot of life lessons in glassblowing. For example, always keep the glass turning and don’t let it get off center. If you keep turning when you are off center, you will get horribly out of shape! Let go of things that don’t go right—just make another one. Sometimes you just have to work with what you get. You can shape things when they are ready, but if they are not, you might break something if you force it. And, make gravity your friend—sound advice for any profession.

I suppose, what we veterans are doing in the Hot Shop Heroes program is art therapy. For me, it is making a difference. It’s been a long time since I’ve looked forward to anything. The civilian world is just different than the military world. I’ve been out for a while and it’s good to be around people who speak the same language again. I am genuinely happy to see everyone at the start of each Hot Shop Heroes session, and I am deeply disappointed if I miss one. We are working on teams again. We look out for each other by shielding with paddles, opening the furnace doors, and watching each other’s sculptures progress. Nothing beats seeing the genuine joy in someone’s eyes when they blow cap a bubble for the first time.

In my day job, I am a marine biologist at Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium (I used the GI Bill and Army College fund to pay for college). I designed and curated the jellyfish exhibition, which exemplifies jellyfish as living art. The exhibit is filled with jellyfish, paintings, sculpture, and music. Glass is of course a natural fit. I’ve been adding pieces we have made in class inside of my jellyfish displays.

jellies-and-glass jellies-and-glass-1

As I progress, I hope to add some amazing substrates for deep-sea creatures to live on—stay tuned. The thing I love most about working with glass is that with enough practice you can make anything you want. I love that freedom.

People sometimes say, “Thank you for your service.” I don’t know how to respond to that… but I can now sincerely say to the Museum of Glass Hot Shop Heroes program, “Thank you for making it worth it.”