Whatcom Museum Offers Free Admission for MOG Members to View Glass Exhibition

Members of Museum of Glass can visit the Whatcom Museum in Bellingham, WA, to explore their newest exhibition, Fluid Formations: The Legacy of Glass in the Pacific Northwest, for free! All members need to do is present their current Museum of Glass membership card at admissions, located in the Lightcatcher building or Old City Hall. This opportunity is available through October 10, 2021. Along with free admission, MOG members can receive 10% off purchases at the Museum Store.

Fluid Formations, which draws from MOG’s permanent collection, celebrates the innovation and striking range of processes and ideas that could only come from decades of a shared passion for the material of glass. From the establishment of Pilchuck Glass School in 1971 to today, the Northwest’s glass community has expanded significantly and has created a rich legacy unique to our region.  Fluid Formations features the art of fifty-seven contemporary artists working in glass from the Pacific Northwest, the epicenter of glass.

Front Entrance to the Lightcather Building
Photo by: C9 Photography

The Whatcom Museum in Bellingham, WA, offers a variety of exhibitions, programs, and activities about art, nature, and Northwest history for all ages. Its multi-building campus is in the heart of Bellingham’s downtown Arts District. The Lightcatcher building, 250 Flora St., and Old City Hall, 121 Prospect St., are open at 50% capacity due to Covid-19 safety restrictions Thursdays–Sundays, 12–5pm. For more information about the Museum’s exhibitions and admission visit, whatcommuseum.org.

MOG Executive Director Discusses The Effects of COVID-19 on Arts and Humanities Organizations with U.S. House Committee

Museum of Glass was honored to be invited to share our experiences dealing with the impact of COVID-19 with the U.S. House Committee of Appropriations on March 25, 2021. MOG Executive Director, Debbie Lenk, was part of a panel discussion regarding “The Effects of COVID-19 on Arts and Humanities Organizations.

We never imagined a world where Museum of Glass would operate for only four months in 2020. It was the first time in 20 years our Hot Shop and programming went idle. During uncertain and dark times, people look to art for healing and inspiration. It was, and remains, a heavy burden for MOG to not be able to serve our community in the same manner we have for two decades.

Lenk voiced how in-person events and visiting artists, which came to a quick halt this past year, play a massive role in the visitors’ experience at the Cone. She added that it is a huge priority this spring to bring back these programs, including Hot Shop Heroes, a glassmaking program for soldiers and veterans with post-traumatic stress, traumatic brain injury, and other depressive disorders.

Our communities need art more than ever. Throughout the past 12 months we have focused squarely on providing what programs we can in order to give people hope, and we have worked to ensure our staff have jobs when MOG can reopen.

Debbie Lenk, Executive Director

You can watch the full panel discussion at: The Effects of COVID-19 on Arts and Humanities Organizations

A transcript is also available at: Ms. Deborah Lenk Testimony

Hindsight is 1921: Reflections on Lalique Near the End of the Pandemic

Written by Katie Buckingham, Curator 

Now that I’m a year into a pandemic, I completely understand why the Roaring Twenties followed the Spanish Flu. I don’t know about you, but after 356 days (and counting) of being marooned in a box on Zoom, I could really use a bigger place. And a fun party. And some new things. 

MOG’s newest exhibition, René Lalique: Art Deco Gems from the Steven and Roslyn Shulman Collection, showcases the pinnacle of Lalique’s career in glass. And, after the last 12 months, I appreciate it from a new perspective. Of course the survivors of World War I and the 1918 influenza pandemic felt the desire to reinvent themselves and live in excess!  

René Lalique (French, 1860–1945) Deux cavaliers (Two Horsemen) Table Centerpiece, 1920 Mold-pressed glass; bronze base 10 × 36 1/4 × 4 in. Promised gift of Steven and Roslyn Shulman Photo by Duncan Price

Their drive to be reborn led to a decade of consumption and revelry that became known as the Roaring Twenties. Lalique’s Art Deco designs are both art and artifact, representing the era’s luxurious aesthetics and the era’s new technologies and social changes.  

The Deux cavaliers (Two Horsemen) table centerpiece is a dramatic composition of two horsemen, poised mid-duel. By the 1920s, many homes had electric lighting. Lalique took advantage of this new technology, designing statement lighting fixtures like this, with enough presence to replace the now-old fashioned candelabras and chandeliers.  

René Lalique (French, 1860–1945) Roscae figurines (Rosette Figurines) Perfume Bottle for Maison Lalique Mold-blown and mold-pressed glass, enamel 4 3/8 × 4 3/8 × 3/4 in. Promised gift of Steven and Roslyn Shulman Photo by Duncan Price

Partly as a result of the suffrage movement, women took center stage in the 1920s. Known as Flappers, these women pushed economic, political, and social boundaries, and their independence sent waves through the design world. Lalique created bottles, like Roscae figurines (Rosette Figurines), with a sculptural eye. They were talismans, representing the sophistication and vibrant independence of their owners.  

Standing in the exhibition, I can’t help but hope we are at the beginning of another Roaring Twenties. I wonder if people from 1920 dreamed of the “after pandemic” with the same visions of celebratory excess that I hope will follow this immensely trying year. I’d like to think so.  

Temporary Museum Closure: How to Stay Connected and Support MOG

Per the direction of Washington state governor Jay Inslee, Museum of Glass is closed through Monday, December 14, 2020 to help curb the spread of COVID-19. We’re saddened to close our doors after just 45 days of reopening, but we’re committed to doing our part in protecting the health and safety of our community and staff.

However, there is good news.

While in-person Museum operations are impacted, there are other, dare we say, great ways to connect with and show your support for MOG.

Museum Store
The MOG Store remains open Friday–Sunday, 10am–5pm. Online shopping is also available at museumofglassstore.org and new products will be dropping over the next days and weeks, so check back often.

In addition, you can get your holiday crafting on with one of our free project kits for dreidels, snowflakes, and candy canes. Pick up yours in the Museum Store starting November 27, 2020.

Junior Curator Academy
Introducing Junior Curator Academy, an interactive mini-series focusing on art objects and installations at Museum of Glass. Listen in as our hosts talk to artists, Museum staff, and subject matter experts as they explore the creative process, influences, and materials used in individual works of art you can find at the Museum.

New Exhibition Alert
Previously scheduled to open on November 27, 2020, René Lalique: Art Deco Gems from the Steven and Rosyln Shulman Collection, will be on view when MOG reopens to the public. Don’t worry, you won’t have to wait that long for a sneak peek. Stay tuned for an opportunity to take a virtual look at this highly anticipated exhibition.

Glass Break
Continue to tune into Glass Break every Monday to watch clips of live glassblowing in the MOG Hot Shop with narration by Emcee Walter Lieberman.

You’ll hear more from us soon. Stay safe and we’ll get through this together. 

The Robert M. Minkoff Collection Gifted to Museum of Glass

Karen LaMonte (American, born 1967)
Child’s Dress, 2007
Kiln cast glass
18 × 21 × 20 in.
Collection of Museum of Glass, gift of Robert M. Minkoff Foundation

Museum of Glass is honored to announce that we received a seminal collection of artwork showcasing the development of glass as a studio and contemporary art medium from the Robert M. Minkoff Foundation. Adding these 400 works of art from Robert Minkoff’s personal collection makes the Museum’s glass holdings the largest in the Western United States.

We are honored and grateful to receive this gift from the Minkoff Foundation. This is the first major Studio Glass collection given to the Museum and it is transformational for us. Its comprehensive representation of glass artists, both nationally and internationally, provides a foundation for MOG to tell vital stories of studio and contemporary glass.

– Debbie Lenk, Executive Director

William Morris (American, born 1957)
Petroglyph Vessel, Turquoise Lip Wrap, 1987
Hand blown glass with glass powders
11 × 25 × 25 in.
Collection of Museum of Glass, gift of Robert M. Minkoff Foundation

Minkoff was a collector, a collector that celebrated the incredible diversity of glass art and its possibilities in the field of contemporary art. His passion and collecting philosophy complements Museum of Glass, which makes this gift so special to us. Minkoff’s collection includes several incredible artists, such as Jaroslava Brychtová, Stanislav Libenský, Klaus Moje, Debora Moore, William Morris, Paul Stankard, Therman Statom, and Lino Tagliapietra. The collection also provides a look at innovative new approaches to the material by artists including Steffan Dam, Luke Jerram, Silvia Levenson, Beth Lipman, and Karen LaMonte.

MOG will celebrate this significant gift with a major exhibition honoring Minkoff and his collection, with accompanying educational programming, opening in Spring 2022. It will be accompanied by a catalog highlighting the breadth of the collection.

Currently, you can view A Glimpse at the Robert M. Minkoff Foundation Collection at Museum of Glass. This installation opened on October 15 and is proudly displayed in our Grand Hall.

To learn more about The Robert M. Minkoff Collection, view the full press release at: The Robert M. Minkoff Collection Gifted to Museum of Glass