Monthly Archives: March 2015

Glassorama: Environments for Kids Design Glass Too

By Katie Phelps, Curatorial Assistant/Visiting Artist Coordinator

In celebration of Kids Design Glass Too (open at Museum of Glass through July 12, 2015), we partnered with five local high schools to continue the original spirit of the Kids Design Glass program – celebrating the creativity and artistic abilities of young artists.

We received 28 project proposals from students at Federal Way High School, Lincoln High School, Tacoma School of the Arts, Thomas Jefferson High School and Wilson High School. Five of these proposals were selected by MOG curatorial staff to be made into full-scale dioramas for the exhibition.

Our five teams recently sent us some progress photos, and it looks like they are making amazing progress:

Federal Way High School:

Kids Design Glass piece: Hamburger Cowboy (James Barr, age 7)

Diorama Title: Hamburger Cowboy – The Good, the Bad and the Meaty

This diorama is set in the town of Greasy Gulch, where Hamburger Cowboy and his sheriff Frank Furt defend the saloon from some seriously evil extraterrestrial veggies

This diorama is set in the town of Greasy Gulch, where Hamburger Cowboy and his sheriff Frank Furt defend the saloon from some seriously evil extraterrestrial veggies.

 A close-up of one of the aliens threatening the peace of Greasy Gulch

A close-up of one of the aliens threatening the peace of Greasy Gulch.

Lincoln High School:

Kids Design Glass piece: Blinky the Crab (Calvin Christoph, age 10)

Diorama Title: Blinky the Crab

The diorama (represented here by a scale drawing) will feature the “scene of the crime” from Blinky the Crab’s original artist statement – the fridge where Blinky consumes the radioactive donut.

The diorama (represented here by a scale drawing) will feature the “scene of the crime” from Blinky the Crab’s original artist statement – the fridge where Blinky consumes the radioactive donut.

Students Belen Contreras, Angel Zuniga and Jorge Zuniga from Lincoln High School are developing new skills in sewing and textiles to make parts of their diorama.

Students Belen Contreras, Angel Zuniga and Jorge Zuniga from Lincoln High School are developing new skills in sewing and textiles to make parts of their diorama.

Tacoma School of the Arts:

Kids Design Glass piece: Girls Night!!! (Madeline Teddy, age 10)

Diorama Title: Girls Night!!! This dolphin is ready for a girls night out!

Student Emma Jury is designing an underwater city, including the Dancing Bowl, where renowned underwater fashion designer Penelope the dolphin spends many evenings out dancing with the girls.

Student Emma Jury is designing an underwater city, including the Dancing Bowl, where renowned underwater fashion designer Penelope the dolphin spends many evenings out dancing with the girls.

SOTA students work on constructing buildings for their diorama.

SOTA students work on constructing buildings for their diorama.

Thomas Jefferson High School:

Kids Design Glass piece: Dino Guy (Mia Perfetti, age 7)

Diorama title: The Phantom of Katy’s Candy Store

A mockup of the diorama from Thomas Jefferson High School. It features Dino Guy as the Phantom, a character who lives underground in the sewer system and comes up at night to raid the candy store.

A mockup of the diorama from Thomas Jefferson High School. It features Dino Guy as the Phantom, a character who lives underground in the sewer system and comes up at night to raid the candy store.

Students at Thomas Jefferson High School have successfully finished building the wood frame for their diorama. They are using a foam replica of Dino Guy to make sure they are building everything to scale.

Students at Thomas Jefferson High School have successfully finished building the wood frame for their diorama. They are using a foam replica of Dino Guy to make sure they are building everything to scale.

Wilson High School:

Kids Design Glass piece: Sockness Monster (Hannah Wilson, age 11)

Diorama title: Welcome to my Crib!

Since Wilson High School has a Hot Shop, their team is working on hot-sculpting several elements for their diorama. Students Jonah Ellestad, Cordell Corbin and instructor Tony Sorgenfrei are seen here working on a hot-sculpted couch.

Since Wilson High School has a Hot Shop, their team is working on hot-sculpting several elements for their diorama. Students Jonah Ellestad, Cordell Corbin and instructor Tony Sorgenfrei are seen here working on a hot-sculpted couch.

Students from Tacoma’s Wilson High School are recreating the washing machine home of the Sockness Monster, partly inspired by the swampy home of Scotland’s infamous Lochness Monster. This sketch details some of the components of the diorama.

Students from Tacoma’s Wilson High School are recreating the washing machine home of the Sockness Monster, partly inspired by the swampy home of Scotland’s infamous Lochness Monster. This sketch details some of the components of the diorama.

These dioramas will be installed and on view at Museum of Glass April 22, 2015. Come check them out!

Katie Phelps is the Curatorial Assistant/Visiting Artist Coordinator at Museum of Glass. She is an alumnus of Whitman College (BA) and University of Washington (MA). In her life outside of the Museum she is outside as much as possible, wearing skis as often as she does hiking boots.   

Red Hot Gala’s 2014 People’s Choice Award Winner Ethan Stern Comes to Museum of Glass

By Alex Carr, Digital Media Coordinator 

Last September, Seattle-based artist Ethan Stern received the People’s Choice Award at the annual Museum of Glass Red Hot Auction and Gala. Stern won for his piece Verdant Sea, and was  offered a 2015 Visiting Artist Residency as part of his prize.

Stern studied ceramic art at both TAFE College of Ceramics in Brisbane, Australia, and Alfred University in New York, but soon found himself drifting toward the art of glass. While attending the Pilchuck Glass School in Stanwood, Washington, Stern began exploring techniques for engraving and carving glass, a process he continues today.

Stern began his five-day Visiting Artist Residency at the Museum this week and is working with the Museum of Glass Hot Shop Team to create pieces for both new and current series that he will eventually carve. Stern is experimenting with clear glass pieces for his new series Clear Coast, while also continuing his 2014 series Lunar Light.

Visiting Artist Residencies allow artists from all over the world to work on their craft without the hindrance of financial constraints. Stern notes, “when you’re experimenting, it’s nice not to have those pressures.”

ethan stern

Ethan Stern (on the left, in the hat) working in the Hot Shop with Benjamin Cobb (left) and Gabe Feenan (right).

With the pressure removed, Stern has been playing with the scale and shapes of his Lunar Light pieces, departing from his more traditional sharper edges to create round, oval, and even teardrop shapes.

And in contrast to the clear pieces he has made for Clear Coast, which he will later carve, Stern is also experimenting with layers of color as he revisits a previous project, Ice Coast, which Stern has previously made in white.

4.Ice Coast

Ethan Stern; Ice Coast, 2013; 10 x 10.5 x 4 inches; Photo by Russell Johnson.

While he did not enter his residency with the intention of making pieces for a specific exhibition, some of the pieces may be included in two of his upcoming exhibitions in the fall and winter of this year, one of which is a show at Seattle’s Traver Gallery in September.

Like many artists who exhibit their work and produce art in their own studios, Stern often finds himself tied to commitments, but coming to Museum of Glass to spend five days in the Hot Shop is a liberating change of pace.

“The opportunity to make things outside of those commitments is energizing,” says Stern. To see him using this artistic energy in the Hot Shop, visit Museum of Glass on Saturday or Sunday, or tune into the Museum’s live stream.

Alex Carr is the Digital Media Coordinator at Museum of Glass. When she’s not circulating the Hot Shop floor trying to get the perfect Instagram shot for the Museum, you’ll find her baking at home, running at Green Lake, or exploring Washington’s wineries.

Shirley Klinghoffer – CRT Revisited Q&A with Mary Ann Wasil

In conjunction with Shirley Klinghoffer: CRT Revisited, an exhibition inspired by hospital forms used to support women’s bodies during radiation therapy, artist Shirley Klinghoffer has invited others who have gone through cancer treatment to share their stories about the “healing objects” that accompanied them on their journey. Klinghoffer, who is a breast cancer survivor, shared her storyand now another survivor, Mary Ann Wasil, has shared her own.

Describe your healing object?

My healing object is a tiny pink hand-knotted Rosary.wasil

Why is it important to you?

My son Eddy made it for me when he was in high school; he is now 21 years old.

Do you have any other stories which you would like to share?

During my eleven-year dance with breast cancer I have always taken great comfort in prayer, especially the Rosary. I am Roman Catholic and have always felt a deep connection with Mary, the mother of Jesus. This brave young woman was chosen by God to give birth to our Savior. Whoa. Not for the faint of heart.

 (It should be noted that when I was a child I actually used to thank God that I was NOT Mary, grateful to Him for choosing her and not me, because I knew I would not have been up to such a daunting task.)

The Rosary is a Scripture-based prayer. You pray the Hail Mary a total of 53 times (along with a handful of Our Fathers, a Glory Be or two – or six, and a Hail Holy Queen for good measure) while reflecting upon the great mysteries of the Catholic faith. Traditionally, specific Mysteries are prayed on specific days of the week during specific times of the Liturgical Calendar.

Frankly, I find it far too confusing – and, well, um, specific.

I love to pray. I “specifically” love to pray the “Hail Mary.”  (That’s me being witty…please forgive me.)

I don’t count sheep, I say the Rosary. I often drive in silence, and say the Rosary. I incorporate the Rosary into my meditation practice. When I was training for the NYC Marathon several years ago, yep, you guessed it, my running partners were a fairly even mix of The Beatles and the Rosary.

It’s my default, my “go-to”…it’s my place of peace, it’s, well, it’s just mine. I love it.

All three of my children know how much the Rosary means to me, so when my son made this delicate little Rosary with his own two hands, he knew how much I would cherish it. I am never without it.

I carry it in my purse or my pocket, even in my hand during my routine MRIs and scans while being treated for stage four metastatic breast cancer these last four years.

I don’t need the Rosary to pray the Rosary. But having the Rosary my son made with me at all times, well, it is, indeed, my most beloved healing object.

Do you have a story to share? Download the submission form and instructions here.